Youth Ending Hunger plants trees and promotes biogas in Manafwa

Youth Ending Hunger (YEHA) is involved in tree planting to improve soil and water conservation. They are also making biogas to minimize the cutting down of trees and benefit from the bio slurry, the by-product of the biogas plant that is used as a fertiliser to improve the soil fertility and get a better crop yield.

YEHA has so far constructed 3 household biogas units. They plan to increase the beneficiary households to 10. Lucas Shilaku is one of the beneficiaries. Lucas said his school going children now have light on which to read. The slurry is manure and his banana plantation is already yielding well. “My neighbours are very interested and have come here to see the biogas but they cannot afford,” he said. The by-product is also fodder for pigs, chicken and fish. So far 3 people in Kaato sub-county have appreciated the value of biogas and are setting up their own.

Lucas Shiraku is enjoying the benefits of using biogas

Lucas Shiraku is enjoying the benefits of using biogas

Ms. Wabulyu Nivarent of Kaato sub-county received tree seedlings including pine, jackfruit and musizi. Almost all her trees are growing well. How will she benefit from this? “I will sell the trees and get an income and the jackfruit will be food for the children,” she said.

The area of Kaato is exposed to soil erosion so the canopy cover will minimize the problem and eventually improve the crop yield. The area is also exposed to heavy winds and the trees will serve as wind breakers. The beneficiaries plan to join a carbon credit scheme since Eco-Trust, an NGO working in carbon schemes is piloting in Kaato sub-county.

10,300 tree seedlings were distributed among 125 people. The seedlings included ovacado, mango, jackfruit, grevalia, musizi and pine. Households got tree seedlings according to the size of their land, with most households receiving between 50-100 seedlings.

YEHA is hopeful that the trees will be a source of nectar for bees and will boost honey production in the area. The fruit trees will improve household nutrition.

A large number of trees survived and are growing well but a few failed. For example, Tsu Tsu waterway overflooded and washed away some seedlings. One farmer lost 230 seedlings of the 300 received. Another lost 220 out of 300 received, mostly musizi and grevalia.

Kataara Women’s Poverty Alleviation Group is making paper from elephant dung

With a $10,000 grant from UNDP, this group of women focused on two activities – construction and promotion of energy saving stoves and eco-tourism. They have constructed 180 energy saving stoves for 180 households of 6 villages of Katara Parish with each village getting 30 stoves. Kataara chose to make fuel-efficient cookstoves to minimize the deforestation and encroachment on the protected area of Queen Elizabeth National Park which neighbours Kataara Parish. “People go collect firewood from the national park and they are shot at, the women get raped there,” said Mr. Moses Agaba, the group’s coordinator.

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Kataara Women working on the cookstoves at their workshop in Rubirizi (Photos by Agnes Asiimwe, WWF)

Those using the stoves are happy to have embraced the new method of cooking. “I would use one head load of firewood per week but I now use the same bundle for two weeks,” said Ms. Birungi Mwanje, who adds that she goes around telling neighbours how the stove has reduced her firewood demand by half. Although the community has been slow at appreciating the value of using these stoves, they are taking it up slowly. Kataara has sold 100 stoves within 3 months.  A stove is sold at 10,000shs.

Kataara hopes to make 5,000 stoves for sale by April 2014. From 10,000 shs made from each stove, 3,000 shs goes to the maker of the stove and 7,000 shs goes to the savings and credit scheme of the group. The group lends out this money to members who are given a three months grace period before paying back with 5 percent interest.

Craft Making

The group is also making handicrafts as a business and to conserve natural resources. Kataara collaborates with Queen Elizabeth National Park to promote conservation of the elephant that is facing threats of poisoning as a retaliation against crop raids, by making paper out of elephant dung.

“We make elephant dung paper to show the community that elephants should be conserved because there are people who kill them for meat and ivory,” said Mr. Agaba. “By using elephant dung it adds value to the elephant.” He added,”Elephants always eat our crops so in a way we are compensating ourselves by picking their dung.”

“Elephants always eat our crops so in a way we are compensating
ourselves by picking their dung.”

At first the members collected the dung from their gardens but now the Uganda Wildlife Authority (UWA) has allowed them to pick the elephant dung from inside the protected area. From the elephant dung Kataara has made visitors’ books and menus for the neighbouring Kataara and Engazi lodges. They are now making greeting cards, photo frames, handbags and writing pads. Handcrafts are a source of income for the members. The office also doubles as a craft shop with baskets, mats, jewelry, cards  and other items. Members make most of the items individually and take to the shop for sale.

ImageThe women pound elephant dung to make paper

You can get in touch with this group at katarawomens@gmail.com

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

STRENGTHENING SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT, CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION AND MITIGATION IN UGANDA PROJECT

Background

Strengthening Sustainable Environment and Natural Resource Management, Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in Uganda (SENRMCAM) is a project funded by United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and implemented by World Wide Fund for Nature, Uganda Country Office (WWF UCO) on behalf of the Government of Uganda. The project aims to strengthen the efforts and capacities of Local Governments, Civil Society Organizations (CSO’s) and communities to sustainably manage and utilize natural resources and build climate change resilient societies.

The project has four key outputs:

i)                   Biodiversity conservation and restoration of degraded ecosystems demonstrated.

ii)                Sustainable Land Management practices identified and replicated.

iii)                Efficient utilization of biomass energy, promotion of renewable energy technologies and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.

iv)                Climate Change resilience promoted.

This project is implemented in collaboration with responsible parties drawn from various ministries, local government and CSOs. The project partners include the Ministry of Water and Environment (MWE), Ministry of Energy and Mineral Development (MEMD), Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries (MAAIF), Ministry of Local Government (MoLG), and International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Call for Project Proposals

As one of the ways to accelerate the implementation of the project and build capacity of the civil society, the project is inviting proposals from NGOs and CBOs in the districts of  Arua, Nebbi, Nwoya, Ntoroko, Bundibugyo, Buliisa, Rakai, Buhweju, Bushenyi, Mbarara, Kiruhura, Kamuli, Nakasongola, Kabale, Kanungu, Kisoro, Soroti, Busia, Kiboga, Luwero, Jinja, Sembabule, Lwengo, Kalungu, Kasese, Mitooma, Rubirizi, Abim, Bududa, Mbale, Moroto, Kotido, Isingiro, Masindi, Masaka,Wakiso and Manafwa to benefit from its small grants scheme.

 The proposed projects may cover but are not limited to the following focal areas:

  1. Sustainable land management
  2. Biodiversity conservation and restoration on private/communal lands
  3. Livelihood improvement enterprises
  4. Renewable energy technologies
  5. Climate change adaptation and mitigation

How to apply

Interested applicants are advised to pick a project proposal template from the WWF UCO Offices at the address below or from Natural Resource offices of the districts mentioned above.

Proposals in hard copy only must be submitted to the address below by 30th January, 2014, not later than 4.00pm.  

The Project Manager

SENRMCAM Project

WWF Uganda Country Office

P. O. Box 8758, Kampala

Plot 2 Sturrock Road, Kololo

Tel: 0414 540 064

 

 

Small Grants Program Takes Off

Small Grants embody the essence of sustainable development by
“thinking globally acting locally”. By providing financial and technical
support to projects that conserve and restore the environment while
enhancing people’s well-being and livelihoods, a Small Grants Program
(SGP) demonstrates that community action can maintain the fine balance
between human needs and environmental imperatives.

SGP’s primary stakeholders are the poor and vulnerable communities that
are most at risk because they depend on access to natural resources for
their livelihoods and often live in fragile ecosystems.
The SENRMCAM Project, supported by UNDP and being implemented by
WWF, is managing a small grants scheme. Close to a billion shillings will
be directly given to community based organizations (CBOs) in the districts
of Moroto, Rubirizi, Isingiro, Kasese, Mitooma, Masindi, Abim, Manafwa,
Bududa and Wakiso.

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The organisations are engaged in several activities including apiary and
tourism promotion, renewable energy, climate change resilience innovation
and sustainable forest management.

The CBOs went through a competitive process. From a total of 224
proposals received, only 36 emerged finalists. The selected groups have
been equipped with the necessary technical skills to help them manage
their proposed projects successfully.

This is the first phase of the small grants program under this project. A
second phase will be rolled out in 2014 during which other CBOs will be
invited to apply for funding.